Musical Memories to Last a Lifetime: TCP’s Spring Concert

By Amanda Bertsch

Thursday, April 17th, was the annual Tri-City concert and art show. 74 students performed and an additional 25 had their art on display. The music department estimates that about 200 people attended.

From 5:00 until just before the concert, artwork was featured in the art garage. Each piece was accompanied by a sheet detailing the artist’s name, the artwork’s title, and an explanation of its symbolism. From a battle between good and evil (Sean Riley, freshman) to a peaceful rendering of proud memories (Shelli Thompson, senior), the works gave an insight in to Tri-City’s students.

By 6:50, everyone was filing in for the concert. The night’s theme, “around the world in 60 minutes,” was well-represented by the stage decorations. A large Arabian-style tent was framed on both sides by drawings of palm trees. Programs were handed out and soon the audience was settling in for the night’s entertainment. “I thought the artwork was absolutely magnificent!” exclaimed Erika Gustafson (freshman, cello). “I was excited to see all the students’ hard work.”“I thought the artwork was absolutely magnificent!” exclaimed Erika Gustafson (freshman, cello). “I was excited to see all the students’ hard work.”

The choir was the first on stage. They sang “Irish Lullaby,” “El Grillo,” and “Orinoco Flow.” “I think we did great,” Elizabeth Winters said later. The audience agreed, cheering them off the stage.

“I think it went well! Our rehearsals definitely helped us improve and prepare,” said DevonBonelli (freshman, violin). The musicians surprised even themselves with their impressive performance.Next up was Beginning Strings. This is a diverse group, with students from freshmen to seniors. At the start of the year, many of them did not know how to read music. They proudly performed three short pieces: “Joust,” “Seventh Symphony,” and “La Mariposas Exoticas.”

“I think it went well! Our rehearsals definitely helped us improve and prepare,” said DevonBonelli (freshman, violin). The musicians surprised even themselves with their impressive performance.

The third group was Chamber Orchestra. This ensemble is composed of the school’s advanced woodwind, brass, percussion, and strings players. It has always been a favorite with the crowd, possibly because it contains more than half the school’s music students. To complete the concert’s world journey, they played three pieces with very different styles. “Bacchanale,” an older and distinctly Arabic-sounding piece, was first. Next was “Satchmo,” a collection of jazz melodies, and they finished with the contemporary “Pirates of the Caribbean.”

The music featured multiple solos.  First was an oboe solo (“Bacchanale”) performed by Mathew Lanning. “Satchmo” was accompanied by a solo trumpeter, Dave Holbrook, who has two grandchildren in the orchestra. Finally, “Pirates” featured a cello solo (Mathew Lanning) and a flute solo (Amanda Bertsch).

The spring finale was a performance of music from Disney’s Aladdin. Choreography for the performance was designed by Mary Rizk and Hyram Yarbro. This music contained a multitude of solos. The street Aladdin was portrayed by Tieran Rashid, with Prince Ali represented by Hyram Yarbro. Jasmine’s part was sang by Ivy Andresen, and the genie was performed by Carly VeNard. Other solos were also sang by Mary Rizk, Ammon Worden, Liam Blankemeier, Nick Magdaleno, and Gus Longacre. The concert was greatly enjoyed by the audience.

“I enjoyed [the concert], particularly the Aladdin medley,” one parent enthused later.

 

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