Archive for the ‘ Guest Writers ’ Category

Senior Send-Off: Advice from Mr. Marman

Dear Short Timers (that would be you, seniors),
All year long, maybe even for the last four years, everyone around you has been saying how fast this time would go. Of course, they were all wrong. It’s gone excruciatingly slow. Sloths move faster. Glaciers move faster. Now admit it, you cannot believe that your senior year is racing toward the finish line. The year has been a blur. Memories pass through your mind and you think “Was that this year? No way. Can’t be.” The year has been filled with fear, excitement, anticipation, a little boredom, maybe some heart ache, maybe (no, absolutely) some drama, sadness, euphoria, stress, lots of stress,
a veritable overflowing cornucopia of stress, apprehension, and the overwhelming sense of ‘the future.’
Aahhh, ‘The Future.’ Always capitalized. Always spoken about in serious tones, full of reverence. Always something that existed out there in the ether. It certainly wasn’t something tangible. You couldn’t touch it, although many said you could. You’ve been listening to people your whole life telling you all kinds of things, full of sage wisdom, instilling in you the way to navigate ‘The Future.’ Make no mistake, these are well-meaning people; they care about you deeply. Indeed, much of what they’ve told is you is the truth. Listen to them, digest what they say, file it away in some inner recess of your brain. When the time comes, you may well be grateful for the advice given many years ago.
The thing is though, it’s your Future. It’s coming at you fast and you’re gonna have to deal with it on your terms. It’s wonderful and a little frightening at the same time. Plan the heck out of it and do everything you can to stick to the plan. The reality though is that it’s not going to go according to plan much of the time. That’s okay, you’ll adapt. You’ll re-tool; make a new plan. Moving ahead doesn’t always go in a straight line. Many times the best experiences in life are the ones that come at us obliquely, hitting us without warning. You’ll meet people that will forever change your life but rarely are they planned encounters. Typically, they involve chance meetings, brought on through coincidence and the vagaries of fate. New best friends, new partners, even new spouses enter our lives through seemingly random events. All the planning is good, but I suggest that these random events are often times where the richest parts of our lives begin, are nurtured, and lived. The deepest relationships are born during these ‘chance meetings.’
Memories of TCP will be with you forever. Mostly good, some not. Many will make you smile and openly laugh while sitting around all by your lonesome. Your classmates, friends and teachers have made an imprint on you and they help make you who you are. You, in turn, have affected those around in ways you’ll never know. Speaking for your teachers and everyone at Tri-City Prep, realize that we are always behind you. We’ve got your back. We are as excited for what your future holds as you are. We know that your passions and desires are in your strong and capable hands. You’ve got this.
After rambling on (remember, I am a math teacher) let me #gettothepoint. Don’t be afraid of the unknown. Embrace it, search it out, meet it head on and wrestle with it. Be cautious when it is necessary but remember, we only really make big change when we get out of our comfort zone and take a chance. A little fear can be a good thing. Sure, you will stumble sometimes, but in the end, we learn more from our mis-steps than we do from easy successes.
Graduates of the Class of 2017, I salute you and applaud you on a job well
done. Now go out and own it.
Ed Marman

Senior Send-Off: Advice from an Alum

For today’s senior send-off, alum Natalie Krafft takes a look at her freshman year in college as a music education major. Below, she lists 100 things she learned in her freshman year, from practice strategies to life advice.

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Essay: Hamlet and Finding the Reality in Ecstasy

By Katherine Christians

This essay was written for Tri-City Prep’s College Composition 102 class.

The protagonist’s father appeared before him; ashen and dressed for battle. The form of his hulking parent is transparent enough to grant him the ability to see the trees behind the once-living man. The ghost of his father tells the harrowing tale of his death to his son; one not of natural causes; but of murder. The son is left alone, bloodless and shaking, with one task: to avenge his father’s death. Though the dramatic air to this moment is admirable, the fact that a ghost appeared to tell his son of it’s murder; is questionable, to say the least. If someone assaulted someone else and then proceeded to tell the jury that they did so because a ghost told them to, their sanity would most likely be questioned. But when such a thing happened in William Shakespeare’s Hamlet, the audience seemed to have no qualms believing in the actions of a madman.

The Shakespearean tragedy, Hamlet, is the story of a young man who’s father just died, and an uncle who stole his throne. Wrought with anger and confusion, Hamlet is told, by the ghost of his father, that his uncle, the new king, was his murderer. Bent on getting revenge for his father’s wrongful death, Hamlet “pretends” to be corrupted with ecstasy; or madness. As the play progresses, Hamlet’s actions, and sanity, grow more questionable; until, finally, Hamlet’s deranged activities lead to the death of his uncle, mother, peer, and himself. The question that haunts the audience during the play is: was Hamlet truly mad, or was he just pretending? Continue reading

Mental Health Awareness in Adolescent Syrian Refugees

By Natalie Krafft

This essay was written by a TCP alum and former Denobis staff member during her freshman year of college.

Ahmed is a young boy, aged eleven, who has just fled Syria from all of its war and devastation. He has left his home, his friends and life as he knew it to flee to Greece. Since being in Greece, he has not been in school for a year and greatly misses his friends. The camp he lives in now is filled with diseases and has poor living conditions. The refugees who live here wait weeks or months before a soldier takes them to a new home. Now, all he wishes is to go to school to be with the other children and to be like them. This feeling of being ostracized is all too normal for him, which has lead him to be more melancholy than he typically was when he was back home (Katz).

For millions of children like Ahmed, this is their reality now, and it is taking a toll on their mental health, which will negatively affect them for the rest of their lives. Families of all sizes abandon everything they know for their safety. Adolescent refugees who are brought with these families have already faced trauma even before they left through the violence and death in their home regions. Their journey to a safer place is just as dangerous and once they arrive, nothing seems to be better right away. For a young person under the age of 19 to experience something as a traumatic as fleeing a war torn country can have some major consequences on their mental health that, if not addressed, could erupt into something much larger and darker such as depression and anxiety. Adolescent Syrian refugees are facing mental health problems because of the displacement from their homeland due to war. Continue reading

The Little Prince: A Review

By Natalie Krafft

On August 5th, Netflix premiered yet another original film, this one based off the book The Little Prince. Director Mark Osborne adds a modern touch to the story that is very needed in this dark world. This new release serves as a good reminder for all kids that they don’t have to grow up just yet.

The story follows a little girl who is being shoved into adulthood too fast by her workaholic mother. It’s not until the little girl meets her eccentric aviator neighbor does she learn to be a child, realizing that getting into Werth Academy isn’t the most important thing. Throughout the movie, the aviator tells stories about the Little Prince. When the aviator is in the hospital, she takes his plane and flies to find the Little Prince. However, when she gets there, she finds that the Little Prince is all grown up. She helps him remember what it was like being a little kid, and he eventually does remember after seeing the sunset (made from part sun and part of the dust remains of his rose that he loved). She goes back finally realizing that even if the aviator dies, he’ll always be with her.

I personally thought that the animation was really unique and well done. It does stick with typical 3D animation, but it also has a sort of paper mache vibe that’s at first awkward but then incredibly fascinating. The music, by Hans Zimmer and Camille (a French singer-songwriter), was great! Camille’s singing was really nice, especially considering that The Little Prince was originally written in French.

The Little Prince book cover

The original cover of the book.

The Little Prince movie cover

The movie cover, with re-imagined illustrations and plot.

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