Posts Tagged ‘ college board ’

Does College Board have too much power?

By Amanda Bertsch

 

As college application season gets into full swing, there’s one name that appears just about everywhere students turn. The College Board is a huge conglomerate that holds a near-monopoly on the testing industry. What many don’t realize is that this organization’s fingerprints can be found in every step of the admissions process.

College Board’s most well-known (and extremely profitable) endeavor is the SAT suite of tests. Sophomores and juniors take the PSAT in preparation for their college admissions tests; juniors and seniors take the SAT and send the resulting scores to colleges. Some particularly ambitious students take SAT 2s, also known as SAT Subject Tests, for a chance to show off particular skills to colleges.

Other College Board programs include the CSS financial aid profile used by top colleges and the CLEP series of assessments to test out of college courses. College Board also runs the AP program, where students can take tests at the ends of high school courses to earn college credit.

To fully understand the impact of the College Board on a student’s academic career, let’s examine a typical high-achieving student applying to Cornell Engineering— call him Sam. The following account tracks Sam from his sophomore year of high school to the end of his freshman year of college.

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What Does the New SAT Mean for You?

By Amanda Bertsch

 

On Saturday, March 5th, students took the redesigned SAT for the first time. This test has been in the works for years—College Board announced the change exactly 2 years before the first test date. The new SAT is supposed to entail less memorization and more application of real-world skills, but what does that mean for the average student? Denobis breaks it all down. Continue reading

Understanding the PSAT

By Amanda Bertsch

 

PSAT results were delivered this past week. Are you still wondering what they mean? What exactly is a good score? And why does the PSAT matter anyway? Denobis’s Study Spot breaks it all down.

The largest number on the score report is the total score, which is the sum of two scores: reading and writing combined and math. These scores range from 160 to 760, so the total is out of 1520. This section of the score report also gives a nationally representative percentile for each of the scores so you can compare your score to the average. For instance, if your percentile for math is a 67%, that means that you scored better than 67% of people in your grade that took the PSAT this year.

This section also shows a red-to-yellow-to-green bar for each score. This gives you a general idea of how prepared you are. If you’re in the green, College Board believes your performance shows that you are on track to be college-ready; yellow means you’re approaching readiness, and red means you need to improve significantly to get on track.

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