Posts Tagged ‘ college ’

Dethrone the Loans: The Answer to Expensive Higher Education

By Markus Weinzinger

Opinion articles do not necessarily reflect the views of the editors, the Denobis staff, or Tri-City Prep.

It’s an inevitable problem faced by students entering the doors of higher education. The massive debt of student loans —over $1 trillion— continues to intimidate prospective students. Graduating with a pile of debt has become all too commonplace. Federal subsidy of student loans brews a toxic mix of good-intentioned theory and college greed that evaporates the hopes of college students along with their bank accounts. How did this happen?

The origins can be traced to the late twentieth century. According to Information Station, in 1980 the cost of attending a four-year college hovered around a comfortable $3,400 annually. Today, that figure has skyrocketed to $23,000 or more annually. More shocking, Bloomberg News reported that the cost of a college education since 1978 accelerated over 1000%, compared to the 265% increase in inflation. It’s now the norm to find a college student (graduate or drop-out) that owes five figures in student loan debt. Who’s responsible for these unprecedented prices? Continue reading

Advertisements

Senioritis Strikes!

By Amanda Bertsch

Four years ago today, Denobis published an article (https://denobis.wordpress.com/2013/03/18/deadly-outbreak-of-senioritis-at-tri-city-prep/) on a phenomenon known as senioritis. The tongue-and-cheek name describes a serious problem: as graduation grows ever closer, many seniors struggle to find motivation for schoolwork and may see their grades drop as a result. On this anniversary, Denobis interviewed several current and past seniors about their experience with the disease. Continue reading

Mental Health Awareness in Adolescent Syrian Refugees

By Natalie Krafft

This essay was written by a TCP alum and former Denobis staff member during her freshman year of college.

Ahmed is a young boy, aged eleven, who has just fled Syria from all of its war and devastation. He has left his home, his friends and life as he knew it to flee to Greece. Since being in Greece, he has not been in school for a year and greatly misses his friends. The camp he lives in now is filled with diseases and has poor living conditions. The refugees who live here wait weeks or months before a soldier takes them to a new home. Now, all he wishes is to go to school to be with the other children and to be like them. This feeling of being ostracized is all too normal for him, which has lead him to be more melancholy than he typically was when he was back home (Katz).

For millions of children like Ahmed, this is their reality now, and it is taking a toll on their mental health, which will negatively affect them for the rest of their lives. Families of all sizes abandon everything they know for their safety. Adolescent refugees who are brought with these families have already faced trauma even before they left through the violence and death in their home regions. Their journey to a safer place is just as dangerous and once they arrive, nothing seems to be better right away. For a young person under the age of 19 to experience something as a traumatic as fleeing a war torn country can have some major consequences on their mental health that, if not addressed, could erupt into something much larger and darker such as depression and anxiety. Adolescent Syrian refugees are facing mental health problems because of the displacement from their homeland due to war. Continue reading

The Infinite Ladder: Elite College Admissions

By Amanda Bertsch

This essay was originally written for a Tri-City Prep class. It represents only the views of the author and not necessarily those of the editorial board, Denobis staff, or Tri-City Prep. The Study Spot column, published bimonthly, aims to shine a light on issues surrounding education and offer assistance to students.

This spring, colleges across the country will be notifying high school seniors about their admissions decisions. Students will rejoice, eagerly accepting offers to their top choice schools or poring over generous financial aid statements. Those lucky few that receive acceptances from the most renown schools in the country will be especially grateful. These students are part of the 10-15% of high school graduates competing for spots at the most selective of schools, typically those that admit less than 30% of applicants (Deresiewicz 40). In the game that is college admissions, and by extension high school, these students have “won.” They earn bragging rights, not only for themselves, but for their parents and schools and communities as well. Applying to highly competitive schools has become a rite of passage for college-bound seniors, a tradition followed religiously by many, but it is hardly one without downfalls.

Continue reading

Does College Board have too much power?

By Amanda Bertsch

 

As college application season gets into full swing, there’s one name that appears just about everywhere students turn. The College Board is a huge conglomerate that holds a near-monopoly on the testing industry. What many don’t realize is that this organization’s fingerprints can be found in every step of the admissions process.

College Board’s most well-known (and extremely profitable) endeavor is the SAT suite of tests. Sophomores and juniors take the PSAT in preparation for their college admissions tests; juniors and seniors take the SAT and send the resulting scores to colleges. Some particularly ambitious students take SAT 2s, also known as SAT Subject Tests, for a chance to show off particular skills to colleges.

Other College Board programs include the CSS financial aid profile used by top colleges and the CLEP series of assessments to test out of college courses. College Board also runs the AP program, where students can take tests at the ends of high school courses to earn college credit.

To fully understand the impact of the College Board on a student’s academic career, let’s examine a typical high-achieving student applying to Cornell Engineering— call him Sam. The following account tracks Sam from his sophomore year of high school to the end of his freshman year of college.

Continue reading